Working Groups

EBICS Research Working Groups

Group Leader
Kara McCloskey (UCM)
 
Group Members
H. Harry Asada (MIT), Linda Griffith (MIT), Paula Hammond (MIT), Roger Kamm (MIT), Hyunjoon Kong (UIUC), Alexandra Peister (MC)
 
 
 

The goal of the Microvascular Networks research is to design and construct functional microvascular networks for use in the next generation of biological machines. 

Group Leader
Steven Stice
 
Group Members
Rashid Bashir (UIUC),
Martha Gillette (UIUC), 
Gabriel Popescu (UIUC),
Maribel Vazquez (CCNY),
Ron Weiss (MIT)

To build biological machines composed of cellular and molecular components that dynamically interact to coordinate larger system functions, it is important to understand the characteristics of the cells and their components and how they behave upon differentiation. Thus, we will determine in real time, using enabling technologies (reporter genes, matrices etc.), how stem cells and progenitor cells exposed to intrinsic and extrinsic cues behave and interact in a coordinated fashion.

Group Leader
Martha Gillette (UIUC)
 
Group Members
Rashid Bashir (UIUC), Linda Griffith (MIT), Roger Kamm (MIT), Hyunjoon Kong (UICU), Michael Levin (TU), Hang Lu (GT), Alexandra Peister (MC), Gabriel Popescu (UIUC), Taher Saif (UIUC), Maribel Vasquez (CCNY), Ron Weiss (MIT)

 

 

 

 

 

Todd McDevitt

Calin Belta

Melissa Kemp

Michael Levin

Hang Lu

Steven Stice

Objective: Direct the co-differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to achieve controlled spatial patterning of multicellular constructs by harnessing biochemical, bioelectrical, and biophysical cues with a focus on initial symmetry breaking.

 

Hypothesis: Coincident differentiation of divergent cell phenotypes with appropriate spatial control is required to achieve functional organoids.

Stas Shvartsman

Calin Belta

Laurie Boyer

Yuhong Fan

Linda Griffith

Roger Kamm

Michael Levin

Ron Weiss

Objective: Direct the co-differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to achieve controlled spatial patterning of multicellular constructs by harnessing biochemical, bioelectrical, and biophysical cues with a focus on subsequent steps towards organoid formation.

 

Hypothesis: Coincident differentiation of divergent cell phenotypes with appropriate spatial control is required to achieve functional organoids.

Taher Saif

Harry Asada

Rashid Bashir

Hyunjoon Kong

Manu Platt

Steven Stice

 

Objective: Develop motile machines involving differentiated and trained neurons, muscle, and vasculature. The machines will have sensing and actuation abilities with elementary logic. They can be stimulated by light or electric fields, chemical gradients, or they can be self-propelled. Performance improvement or optimization can be achieved through training or adaptation. 
 

Hyunjoon Kong

Linda Griffith

Roger Kamm

Taher Saif

 

Objective: Develop pumping and filtration biomachinery involving differentiated and trained neurons, muscle, and vasculature. The machines will have abilities to transfer biologically relevant fluids through synthetic conduit or blood vessels and further remove impurities in a spontaneous or external stimuli-responsive manner.

 

Hypothesis: Such machines will emerge through cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions under the guidance of specific chemical, mechanical, and electrical cues.